The Importance of Plaintiff Credibility in Determining Causation

A recent Nova Scotia Supreme Court case, Gale v Purcell, 2018 NSSC 319, demonstrates how the credibility of a plaintiff can play a central role in assessing causation in a motor vehicle accident. Background On September 19, 2006, the Plaintiff, Angela Marie Gale (“Gale”) sustained injuries in a motor vehicle accident (“2006 MVA”). On March […]

June 25, 2018

Supreme Court of Canada Clarifies the Scope of Existing Duties...

In Rankin (Rankin’s Garage and Sales) v. J.J., 2018 SCC 19, the Supreme Court of Canada clarified how it will interpret existing duties of care, in the context of a personal injury arising from the theft of a vehicle stored at a commercial garage, and the evidentiary requirements for establishing novel duties of care.

Mitigation, Credibility and Deductions: A Case Comment on Ryan v....

In Ryan v. Curlew, 2018 NLSC 72, the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador assessed damages in the context of a personal injury claim.

The Day After: Canada’s Breach Notification Rules Soon to be...

Local and global data breaches remain headline news. From Facebook’s disclosure of its sharing of millions of users’ profiles (without their consent) to the recent data breach involving the Nova Scotia government’s Internal Services website, awareness is growing about privacy rights, how people share data, and how personal information is protected.

January 8, 2018

Notice of Delay: Simon says, “I am making a claim.”

Contrary to the perception that lawyers thrive in loopholes, when a dispute arises, the concepts of fair and reasonable are consistent. It is on that basis that most parties are able to work through disputes without commencing litigation.

October 4, 2017

Changing Tides: Enforcement of Termination Provisions

From the employer’s perspective, one of the most beneficial terms in an employment contract is a prescribed notice period in the event of a “without cause” termination.

Mitigation Income: What’s In and What’s Out?

Under the common law, an employee who is terminated without cause is entitled to reasonable notice of termination, or pay in lieu thereof. That entitlement is not free of conditions.

Working Notice not Appropriate for Employees on Medical Leaves of...

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court, McLeod v 1274458 Ontario Inc., 2017 ONSC 4073, confirms that working notice does not apply where an employee is unable to work due to a medical leave of absence.

November 23, 2016

Serious and Temporarily Disabling Injuries Satisfy Definition of Minor Personal...

In the decision of Douthwright v. Duffy, 2015 NBQB 224, the 43 year old Douthwright was injured in a serious roll-over accident. Liability was admitted, but the parties differed on damages.

November 9, 2016

Termination Clauses: Nova Scotia Supreme Court Weighs In

In recent years, there have been many decisions on the enforceability and interpretation of termination clauses in employment contracts – which employers and their legal counsel read with both interest and apprehension.