Registration Under the Controlled Goods Program

September 16, 2014

Prior to 1999, Canada had enjoyed an exemption to the United States’ International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”) which allowed the importation of certain controlled goods without a license. The United States’ State Department removed Canada’s exempt status over their concerns regarding the potential for such goods to be obtained by criminals or terrorists. Canada’s response was to create the Controlled Goods Program (“CGP”) which regulates access to controlled goods and technologies, including ITAR-controlled goods. As a result of implementing the CGP, Canada is once again able to rely on an exemption to ITAR.

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Registration Under the Controlled Goods Program

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