Employment & Labour Regional Newsletter December 2012

December 6, 2012

With the holidays only a few weeks away, many employers have already turned their thoughts toward their annual holiday party. However, without sufficient safe guards in place, the holiday party can be transformed from the social event of the year to a litigation nightmare. If, as an employer, you are planning a holiday gathering at which alcohol is served, you should be aware that you may be exposing your company to significant financial liability for the actions of an impaired guest. The issue of Host Liability is categorized in three ways: Commercial, Social and Employer. Click here for more.

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Cox & Palmer publications are intended to provide information of a general nature only and not legal advice. The information presented is current to the date of publication and may be subject to change following the publication date.